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时时怎样算跨度:冒

文章来源:华夏黑客联盟论坛    发布时间:2019-12-12 05:41:09  【字号:      】

提供最新时时彩时时怎样算跨度全天免费计划 复式杀码 倍投技巧 预测走势图 分分彩PK10时时怎样算跨度杀一码公式 龙虎倍投最稳技巧 和值和尾跨度 公式算法,最新相容:Simply to Thy cross I cling.鈥

p. 34But still we read in Scripture of another sacrifice鈥攁 sacrifice which Christian people are called to offer. Thus in this text St. Paul says, 鈥淚 beseech you therefore, brethren, by the mercies of God, that ye present your bodies a living sacrifice, holy and acceptable unto God, which is your reasonable service.鈥 To this appeal the words in our Communion Service are the Christian鈥檚 reply:鈥斺淎nd here we offer and present unto thee ourselves, our souls and bodies, to be a reasonable, holy, and living sacrifice unto thee.鈥 It clearly remains, therefore, for us to examine the character of this second sacrifice, and also its relationship to the great and perfect sacrifice completed on the cross for sin. This, then, if God permit, shall be our subject this morning. May the Lord dispose our hearts to bring to Him this holy sacrifice, that we, if we live, may live not unto ourselves, but unto Him 鈥渢hat died for us, and rose again!鈥nod32 密码III. But our third question still remains,鈥斺淚n what way, or by what means, is this great object to be attained?鈥 I am, of course, speaking of the human instruments, and not of the sovereign power of God the Holy Ghost, without whom nothing is strong, and nothing holy.1. The words themselves prove that they are figurative. Turn to 1 Cor. xi. 25, where we read: 鈥淭his cup is the new testament in my blood.鈥 Is there any one blind enough to suppose that the cup was changed into the new testament? The words must mean that the cup was an emblem of the covenant. When our Lord said, 鈥淚 am the vine,鈥 鈥淚 am the door,鈥 鈥淚 am the bread of life,鈥 He did not mean that He was changed into a vine, into a door, or into bread, but that all these things were emblems of His work. So He says of the cup, that it is an emblem of the covenant; and if we would be consistent interpreters, we must believe also of the bread that it was declared to be an emblem of the body.时时怎样算跨度p. 6The words teach us that at the present time our Blessed Lord and Saviour is at the right hand of God, and they suggest two subjects, His place, and His employment.

时时怎样算跨度3. That this sacrifice is a sacrifice of propitiation for sin. There is a sacrifice of self-dedication, which every loving heart is required to offer: as in the words after the Lord鈥檚 Supper,鈥斺淗ere we offer and present unto Thee ourselves, out souls and bodies, to be a reasonable, holy, and lively sacrifice unto Thee.鈥 But in that case the offering is ourselves, and the motive is not propitiation, but dedication. According to the teaching of Rome the offering is the Lord Jesus Christ, and the object is to make a propitiation for sin.

I. On the authority of the ministry this text is perfectly clear; for the Apostle traces it to no human source when he says, 鈥淎ll things are of God, who hath reconciled us to Himself by Jesus Christ, and hath given to us the ministry of reconciliation.鈥 The ministry, therefore, is a gift from God, and not a plan of human contrivance. It is not an arrangement adopted p. 49by the great Christian society as a means for its own improvement, but it is an institution by the authority of the Founder of that society, God Himself. Both the office and the men are gifts from God. In this passage he speaks of the office, and says, 鈥淕od hath given us the ministry of reconciliation;鈥 and in v. 19, 鈥渉ath committed to us the word of reconciliation.鈥 The men, therefore, received their office from their God. Just so he said to Archippus (Col. iv. 17), 鈥淭ake heed to the ministry which thou hast received in the Lord, that thou fulfil it.鈥 But perhaps the most striking passage on this subject is St. Paul鈥檚 address to the elders of the Church of Ephesus, in Acts, xx. 28; for he there teaches not merely that the ministry in general was given to these elders, but that they had been made by the Holy Ghost overseers of that particular people amongst whom they were called to labour. 鈥淭ake heed, therefore, unto yourselves, and to all the flock, over which the Holy Ghost hath made you overseers, to feed the Church of God which He hath purchased with His own blood.鈥 Now, bear in mind that these persons were not apostles, nor persons holding any extraordinary office, as some did in those early days, but ordinary p. 50clergymen; some, probably, ordained by St. Paul himself, and some by Timothy, appointed to labour together amongst the rapidly increasing church in the large heathen town; and mark well the fact, that the Apostle does not say, 鈥淭o which I appointed you,鈥 or 鈥渢o which Timothy appointed you,鈥 but he regards the appointment as from God Himself, and says, 鈥淲hereof the Holy Ghost hath made you overseers.鈥

II. Such, then, is the contrast; and now let us turn, in the second place, to the reason of it. Why were those ancient sacrifices so often repeated? and why was ours once and for ever? The same passage that brings out the contrast explains the reason of it; and the reason is that, p. 24in themselves, they have no saving power, and that ours has. They were ineffectual for the blotting out of sin, but the one offering of our Blessed Lord was perfectly effectual in the very point where they failed. There was as great a contrast in respect of efficiency as there was in respect of frequency; and, in fact, the repetition was the result of weakness, as the oneness was the result of complete sufficiency. This insufficiency is placed in two points of view in the chapter, for we are there taught, first, that these sacrifices could not take away sin, and, secondly, that they could not satisfy the conscience.鈥淏ut this man, after he had offered one sacrifice for sins for ever, sat down on the right hand of God.鈥3. That this sacrifice is a sacrifice of propitiation for sin. There is a sacrifice of self-dedication, which every loving heart is required to offer: as in the words after the Lord鈥檚 Supper,鈥斺淗ere we offer and present unto Thee ourselves, out souls and bodies, to be a reasonable, holy, and lively sacrifice unto Thee.鈥 But in that case the offering is ourselves, and the motive is not propitiation, but dedication. According to the teaching of Rome the offering is the Lord Jesus Christ, and the object is to make a propitiation for sin.

Simply to Thy cross I cling.鈥

They could never, therefore, satisfy the conscience; as you read, Heb; x. 1, 2:鈥斺淔or the law, having a shadow of good things to come, and not the very image of the things, can never with those sacrifices which they offered year by year continually make the comers thereunto perfect. For then would they not have ceased to be offered? because that the worshippers once purged shall have had no more conscience of sins.鈥滻. The contrast.The text stands very near the conclusion of a most important argument, in which the Apostle has been drawing the contrast between the Jewish sacrifices under the ceremonial law and the one perfect sacrifice wrought out for us by p. 19the Son of God on the cross. The contrast commences with the 25th verse of the 9th chapter, and extends to the 14th verse of the 10th; after which we are led to the practical application of the whole epistle. Let us, then, first, carefully study the point of contrast, and then the reason of it.

Such, then, is the contrast, and such the reason for it. What, then, are we to think of the teaching of the Church of Rome when it says,鈥斺淚n this divine sacrifice which is performed in the Mass, that same Christ is contained, and sacrificed without blood, who once, with blood, offered Himself upon the altar of the Cross?鈥 [27] And again:鈥斺淚f any man shall say that the sacrifice is not propitiatory, and profits the receiver only, and ought not to be offered for the living and the dead, for sins, punishments, satisfaction, and other necessities, let him be anathema?鈥 Now, what do these passages teach?

In every work carried on by man we are perfectly certain to meet with human infirmity, and human error; and the work of the ministry forms no exception to the rule. It is carried on by common men, with common flesh and blood, exposed to the common temptations of common life, so that we are sure to find in it the common failures of our common humanity. Yet, with all this, it fills a most important place in the life of all of us. It not only imparts a distinctive character to our public worship, but it reaches our home life; so that there is not a family in a parish that is not, in some way or other, more or less affected by the ministry in p. 47the Church. The influence may not always be for good, but it always exists. In some cases it may be simply negative, and actually do harm by not doing good. In some cases it may be positively mischievous, as when it is made the means for the dissemination of deadly error. While in many it is made God鈥檚 means for conferring incalculable blessings; so that through it the young are instructed, the careless awakened, inquirers directed to the Lord Jesus Christ, and the children of God confirmed in faith and aroused to holy energy for their Lord. The position of a clergyman is such that the influence of his ministry is sure to be felt throughout his parish. He has the sacred privilege of leading the worship of the religious portion of his people. They are all brought into contact with his office, and all are, some way or other, affected by the manner in which that office is fulfilled.




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